Jump to content
Click here if you are having website access problems ×

O/T rust on camshaft


charlie_pank

Recommended Posts

Having just spent a weekend dropping a 'new' lump into the Pug (306 TD), I thought I'd lift off the cam-cover and add some oil, so that on the first turn-over there's some oil in the head. (Intercooler normally sits over cam-cover, so normal filling is via extra-wide dipstick tube, straight into sump).

 

When I took the cover off, I discovered a fair amount of rust on the cam lobes, and the whole of the inside of the head was pretty damp. (Engine stood out in a rainstorm while I was doing the changeover at the weekend).

 

The XUD engine is reputed to be pretty bulletproof, although I'm replacing it because the last one snapped the camshaft in 2 places due to a suspected oil-feed blockage.

 

I'm tempted to just run it as is, but change the oil and filter in about 500 miles. Am I making a big mistake?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless the pitcure exagerates it, that looks more than stood outside in the rain over a weekend. That's stood outside in the rain for 6mths or more, with the filler cap off.

 

The oil film on engine parts usually protects them from rust for some considerable time - I've left scrap, used, parts outside for months, unprotected, and not got that much rust.

 

I'd be checking the rest of the engine . . .

 

Bri

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I'm sure the rust is due to more than the rain at the weekend - I meant that the rain must have leaked through the cam-cover bolts at the weekend, which is why the head is wet in the photo.

 

There was a good layer of rust inside the water-pump housing too. I'm not sure I can face lifting the head off to check the cylinders too, not now it's back in the car again

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know what, he is!

 

Just remembered that although engine #2 snapped the camshaft, engine #1 didn't and is still in the garage. I reckon I could swap them over in an hour, the fiddliest bit being re-timing the belt with very little room down the side of the engine. Having done it twice with the engine out of the car, I'm sure I can do it in-situ.

 

Edited by - charlie_pank on 20 Apr 2011 14:48:29

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Scotchbrite, yes. My addition this tip is to squeeze grease into the scotchbrite cloth. This will collect up the iron and any abrasive which falls off the s/brt.

Refresh the grease probably once for each lobe.

 

Then fire it up and get it going towards a very early lube service.

 

Hee hee. These turbo ones don't seem as bomb proof as the "very steady" 68bhp n/a version.

 

Enjoy!

 

Peter

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I pulled the camshaft, it's all rough, scored and pitted so I took the shaft from my spare engine and shoved that in. Of course EVERY SINGLE follower now needs re-shimming . I'm going to use the followers from the spare engine as well, as every single one needs re-shimming as it is I may as well use the newer-looking followers that went with that cam originally. Any reason why I shouldn't?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you ordered all of the shims already? If not, let me know what sizes you need as I've got access to a pile of new and used shims from when I had to do mine. You normally have to buy them in pairs or something silly like that.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

million miles

 

Ha... ha...

 

Engine #1 came with the car. The car says that it had done about 115,000 miles. It was replaced with engine #2 because the head gasket was leaking so much oil it was antisocial and it is reputed to be easier to replace the engine than the head-gasket in-situ

 

Engine #2 was mail-ordered and allegedly had done 80,000 miles before I put it in in July last year. It snapped the camshaft after 5,000 miles of abuse from me (actually Helen was driving when it snapped)

 

Engine #3 arrived a couple of weeks ago. I'm bloody glad I whipped off the cam-cover to lubricate the head directly before firing it up, otherwise we'd be on to #4 before I knew it...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mankee, can you give me some help? I've got the engine back in the car, re-shimmed and running (hurray) the only issue being that the rev-counter is not working any more. I strongly suspect that I simply haven't plugged in the loom connector for it. Can you confirm where it is and what the plug looks like so that I can find it and check? - I think it's on the edge of the bellhousing and reads the flywheel...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's pretty much as you say Charlie. The flywheel sensor for rev counter is on the back of the engine/gearbox. Easiest to find if you lay on your back and look straight up near where the O/S driveshaft goes in. It's a generic-looking black sensor/plug from memory! If that doesn't work still, let me know and I'll go find one from my local French car scrappy. *smile*
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, it was easy. From the description I thought it was on the gearbox, in which case I couldn't figure out why it wasn't working (I kept the old gearbox). Once I had a wriggle underneath in the spot you suggested, it was easy to see (with a head-torch). As it's part of the engine I have 2 spares - so I just replaced with a known working one and now all is fine. Just waiting for some 10mm vacuum hose to restore power-braking!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...