Removing Dash / Scuttle

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Drumster
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Have you taken the knee trim panels off? If riveted on then simply drill them out and use self tappers to refit.

Once the knee trim panels are off you'll see what you're dealing with. It'll either be a large scuttle retaining bracket with 2 captive nuts or simply 2 nuts. The scuttle itself is secured to the chassis by 2 nuts on 2 vertical studs.

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JP
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#12 - No - but I will - thank you.

I'm thinking that when I rebuild, I may use a lot of self tappers rather than rivets for refitting panels...

The strip down is getting quite frustrating - almost every fixing is corroded and the heavy use of rivnuts rather than threaded holes or accessible nuts just adds extra aggro and time consumption. I wonder if mine was built before copperslip was invented...

Anyway, all the better once it's done!

JP
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Productive day today!  Got the dash out complete with all wiring, ECU etc intact.  This was the plan to avoid too much labeling and scope for error on rebuild.  As per advice drilled out the rivets between scuttle top and bulkhead which made the job much easier.  My scuttle is not held on by the windscreen bolts, but instead just the two studs from the chassis which were really corroded.  I now know how much better PlusGas is than other variants for freeing seized fastenings!

Here is today's progress:

So, on rebuild I definitely need a way to remove the scuttle top easily. Is there any reason not to use self tappers rather than rivnuts?

SLR No.77
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Very well done, that's quite an achievement and should make reassembly much easier.

Re self tappers, in my opinion they're more likely to work loose and enlarge the holes than using rivets or rivnuts.

Stu.

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JP
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#15 - good point.  I might just re-rivet.  Easier to remove than a rivnut if the fastening seizes and the nut end starts spinning...it takes no time to drill out a bunch of rivets an refit and, in reality, it's not going to come off very often, if at all.

OldAndrewE
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If you want to reduce the possibility of the rivnut spinning try smearing some araldite (other epoxy resins are available) on them before crimping up

Andrew

1985 S3 1700 XFlow.  Undergoing full restoration

Jonathan Kay
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"I now know how much better PlusGas is than other variants for freeing seized fastenings!"

I agree, but there's not much evidence out there.

It's only just occurred to me that this sort of job offers the opportunity for a blinded trial!

Jonathan

JP
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#18 - probably to late now - I'm now down to stripping the front and rear suspension and steering and then it's off to Arch.

But I would say, that I've been soaking some fastenings in WD40 for weeks now with no joy, but I managed to find a can of PG this week and fixings that were stuck fast yesterday have freely come undone today!

No doubt someone will be along shortly to tell me that they are exactly the same save for the name...

 

Jonathan Kay
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It won't be me!

: - )

Jonathan

DirtBuddha
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I too have pondered self tapping screws, but M3 sized Allen head bolts with copper slip into rivnuts should not seize over time. They're not structural, aren't holding two critical items together and therefore don't need to be done up too tight.

Also, if you remove the bolts holding the steering column clamp in place you can simply lift out the flat sheet of aluminium that is the bulkhead to gain greater access. 

 

 

"You only live once - but if you do it right, once is enough" - Mae West