An interesting view on electric vehicles

9 posts / 0 new
Last post
BrettJ
Offline
Last seen: 7 hours 16 min ago
Joined: 17/01/2019
An interesting view on electric vehicles
ScottR400D
Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 3 min ago
Joined: 23/08/2015

Well presented but nothing that we're not aware of is it? 

I would argue against his suggestion that the automotive industry has very cleverly shifted the problem from themselves, or words to that effect. 

If the automotive industry had had its way we'd all now be running high(ish) efficiency, tiny, lean burn petrol engines with ERS and other efficiency aids. 

It's the moronic governmental institutions that have taken us where we are with their 'diesels are the answer', 'diesels are bad', EVs are the answer floundering. 

And still no one mentions overpopulation........

L7C
DougBaker
DougBaker's picture
Online
Last seen: 1 min 10 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

It's not the level of population that you should worry about, more what that population chooses to do with the available energy reserves https://www.economicshelp.org/blog/5988/economics/list-of-countries-energy-use-per-capita/

1.6K Roadsport SV

Tom_Arundel
Tom_Arundel's picture
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 13 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

He didn`t mention the fact that batteries have a finite life and will need replacing well before the car or the CO2 and pollution from the copper based infrastructure needed to charge them all 

The population will be sorted out by nature...wars....diseases....starvation ....etc. as it always has

Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay's picture
Offline
Last seen: 23 min 19 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Wars, diseases and starvation are less common than they were.

Jonathan

Tom_Arundel
Tom_Arundel's picture
Offline
Last seen: 8 hours 13 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

At the moment Tank

SLR No.77
SLR No.77's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 hour 31 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

#4  I suspect if you look at the historical figures for war, disease and starvation vs population growth, the latter is winning hands down.

Caterham and Lotus Seven Club Leadership Team Member

The register for all numbered limited-edition Caterhams ....... www.thecaterhamregister.net ...... www.instagram.com/thecaterhamregister

ScottR400D
Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 3 min ago
Joined: 23/08/2015

#7 Exactly.

#3 Not really Doug, if we all got to the lowest emissions per capita, which won't happen of course we'd still have an issue which will continue to be an issue until population growth at least ends. 

#4 Have a look what happened to the population level during the recent pandemic or what's happening now during the current wars all over the planet. 
EV batteries can and are at this moment being repurposed when they're not able to drive a car and recycled when they're totally unusable.

Manufacturer warranties:

each EV manufacturer offers: 

Audi Eight years/100,000 miles

BMW Eight years/100,000 miles

Honda Eight years/100,000 miles 

Hyundai Eight years/125,000 miles

Kia Seven years/100,000 miles

Mercedes Eight years/100,000 miles

MG Seven years/80000 miles

Jaguar Eight years/100,000 miles

Nissan Eight years/100,000 miles

Polestar Eight years/100,000 miles

Porsche Eight years/100,000 miles

Renault Eight years/100,000 miles

Seat Eight years/100,000 miles

Smart Eight years/62500 miles

Tesla Eight years/120,000 miles (150,000 miles for the Model S and Model X)

VW Eight years/100,000 miles

Volvo Eight years/ 100,000 miles 

Britishvolt says that modern EV battery packs are designed to last up to 12 years and once these batteries do become degraded, they have a second life as storage for renewable energy

 

  

 

L7C
Skorn
Offline
Last seen: 1 day 15 min ago
Joined: 04/03/2022

https://flip.it/vCQPcT

 

The view that the battery will need to be replaced is technically correct but a bit overblown.  This Tesla has done 1 million miles, but the battery was only replaced at 746,000 miles.  Yes the battery will need to be replaced for electric cars, but in the vast majority of cases the car will either die, or be scrapped long before we get to that point.  How many internal combustion cars do you know of with 750k miles?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2IKCdnzl5k

 

Here is another video discussing whether keeping your old car or buying a new car is better for the environment.  It really depends what vehicle you are replacing.  My SAAB somehow manages to get 23mpg from a 2.0 turbo (Quite how they have managed this I do not know.  £615 yearly tax is painful for a slow estate car...).  I am planning on replacing it with a hybrid or BEV, and because the SAAB is so inefficient it's almost a no brainer.  If you drive a 5 year old car with already very good fuel economy it makes a bit less sense.