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Roger King
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Poor show from NHS

Every single bit of goodwill that the NHS had from me for Covid has just been flushed down the drain.

This morning, I took my wife for a pre-booked mammogram at a trailer unit in our local supermarket. My wife is in a wheelchair with MS and I was mildly surprised to see that the trailer had no disabled access at all.

No matter, I thought, I'll get her up the steps with some help, but on asking for said help they all stood there and replied, "Oh no, health and safety, we aren't able to help. I pointed out that I have type 2 diabetes, arthritic knees and had a heart attack three months ago and that I needed help. No dice, they still all refused to help. Apparently health and safety means that it is safer for someone in my condition to do this alone than it is for any of them to get involved. I was absolutely livid and rather disgraced myself with my language. And for the record, they all stood there and watched as I did it.

If anyone else tells me that health and safety is a serious issue and it isn't just used as something to hide behind I will likely punch them in the face.

For the record, my wife has had several falls when out and about and in every case complete strangers have come to her aid without a hint of "health and safety" - because something needed doing and they did it. But we have an NHS - an NHS for God's sake, that hides behind regulations without a thought for the good of the patients - or common sense. And I thought they were there to look after people's health - I no longer believe that.

If there are any people in the NHS with some common sense, you need to hammer it in to the powers that be that rules need to be flexible and applied proportionately and sensibly. If, for example, I had been trying to get a grand piano up the steps I would have had some understanding, but my wife is a vulnerable human being and not in the same weight category (or anywhere near it).

Elon Musk was recently quoted as saying that if a company rule didn't make sense in a particular set of circumstances, the employees were free to break it providing they could justify their actions. It seems that the exact opposite is preached within the NHS.

Yes, it's a rant, but by God I mean it, and I am now unable to look at anyone in the NHS without thinking "jobsworth". I'm absolutely disgusted with them.

 

(22/6/22 moderated subject title - membership sec)

SM25T
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Sorry to hear that, Roger. What an abysmal situation.

ScottR400D
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Yes, that sounds bad. I'm sure it's not a universal attitude (well, I would hope it isn't) but sadly, I don't find it too surprising. 
 

From the other thread "NHS funding is not the issue, attitude would be a good starting point."

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DougBaker
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You got sent to a non wheelchair accessible site, that is the only problem.

Can you imagine how furious you would be if they had dropped your wife trying to manhandle her up the stairs in her wheelchair?

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ScottR400D
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#4 If they were concerned they wouldn't have:

"And for the record, they all stood there and watched as I did it."

In all honesty it seems incredible that the NHS would have any mobile unit without disabled access........not much joined up thinking there. 

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Roger King
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#4 she wasn't in the wheelchair to get up the steps. She is able to stand on steps holding on to a handrail at each side. You just have to lift her legs manually up each step. If it was so dangerous, why didn't they stop me as well? Answer - it wasn't dangerous, but they have a jobsworth culture.

A friend of mine used to work for the highways agency as a "plastic" police patrolman. They weren't allowed to tow broken down vehicles, instead having to call a recovery truck. But he said that in reality if the vehicle had come to a halt just a few hundred yards from a turning or a service area they would tow them along the hard shoulder because in their judgement it was a safer option than leaving them waiting and at the mercy of passing traffic. A classic case or "Here are the rules. Stick to them, but use your initiative and make an assessment of each individual situation to see if an alternative action would be better". He also said they would often break the rules and change someone's flat tyre if they considered it safe to do so, because it would clear the hard shoulder faster.

Golf Juliet Tango
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I'm sorry to hear the tale Roger. The issue is that your wife should have been given an appointment elsewhere.

See also:-  https://www.itv.com/news/granada/2022-06-22/disabled-man-dragged-himself-up-stairs-after-station-staff-refused-to-help

Stephen

Democratic dissent is not disloyalty, it is a positive civic duty

DougBaker
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A recent episode of More or Less looked into the claim that "Are damages for maternity mistakes now more than wages for maternity nurses and doctors?" 

The financial risks of being sued after mistakes are huge, the chance that you will be met by someone with the verbal skills to explain that clearly in a stressful situation are low. 

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ScottR400D
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No wonder the country's in the mess it is. 

There's a way to reduce the financial cost of mistakes  and maybe it starts with having people who can communicate whilst under stress? 

Not that I see any reason for anyone other than the OP and his wife to have felt stressed in this instance. 

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opplock
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"If there are any people in the NHS with some common sense"

There are some. They tend to work as Complex Care Nurses, District Nurses and Home Treatment doctors. From my experience (2.5 years with wife on end of life care, thankfully pre lockdowns) a good Complex Care Nurse is worth more than a hospital full of Consultants. 

john aston
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I sympathise with RK , of course , and I'd share his anger . But let's think why a situation arose like this in the first place ... the country has changed immensely in its approach to risk over recent decades , and that isn't bad news . The number of fatal injuries  at work has fallen to just over 120 pa , down from 800 plus in the sixties .

We live in a society which on the one hand has a popular press which loves to run 'it's health and safety gone mad !' stories but adverts for no win , no fee lawyers are regulars on  TV (oddly enough , during daylight hours ,usually...) and I've seen them even on hospital notice boards. No pain without a claim has become a mantra - look at the absurd number of  whiplash claims we have - in cars with proper headrests and decent belts .

Personal injury claims can involve huge amounts of damages , yes, but it's not always like a bonus or lottery win , not a few quid for a holiday from a made up whiplash claim. Suppose someone suffers a  major back trauma after lifting something awkwardly at work . They can't work again - so what do they do , put up and shut up and live on benefits?Because that was how we treated many working class claimants in the past (including one of my wife's relatives). We are a bit more civilised - if the employer was at fault , through poor training for example , the hurt employee should be recompensed for loss of earnings , pain and suffering and so on . And especially for a younger, well paid  employee , the damages can run into many millions . The NHS paid 1.5 billion in damages in 2020/21 . That may explain and justify the caution shown.