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BenF
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Gas is a lot cheaper per kWh than electricity.  On that basis, it certainly has a head start in terms of cost, when considering heating, but I'm not sure what the overall efficiency is.

Gareth H
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You shouldn't have to adjust your thermostat, your boiler will just fire for longer to maintain the same room temp.

Wrightpayne
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An interesting topic - while we see a lot of debate and penalisation (IMHO) of cars and motorists there is less 'attention' on the 28m dwellings in the UK (plus business premises). They all (mostly) have a carbon +ve affect on the environment.

We've had levies on gas/elec bills to fund initiatives but we're still reliant on fossil fuels to heat homes and produce electricity. Electric cars are the future (not) but they still (currently) need fossil fuels to generate electricity to charge them. What is the long term plan for heating homes?

Golf Juliet Tango
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there is less 'attention' on the 28m dwellings in the UK (plus business premises). 

For certain sure. I would say that the Insulate Britain protesters were right to make a fuss. 

Stephen

Democratic dissent is not disloyalty, it is a positive civic duty

Gareth H
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The government would like to see homes heated with heat pumps running on renewable electricity, I'm not sure how long it will take to achieve that generating capacity. Although more recently there has been talk of converting gas boilers to run on hydrogen 

aerobod
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I don't think there is a single solution that will allow "net-zero" to be reached. Energy consumption reduction should definitely be a first approach as far as possible with insulation, draught sealing and zone heating being some of the items. All new builds should have target energy consumption targets set, measured and penalties imposed for buildings not meeting them.

Beyond consumption reduction, heat pumps, electric baseboard heating, hydrogen in the existing gas pipelines (although beware of "Blue Hydrogen" as a potential natural gas interests scam) should all be explored.

Then things to smooth the electrical grid usage should also be deployed as necessary, such a residential solar, electric usage rates adjusted to incent plugged in cars and residential batteries to only draw power when the grid is not stressed and supply power back when it is.

Lots of possibilities and technologies available now, it will take, strategic vision, money, proper planning and the right incentives to get the best outcome.

James

Golf Juliet Tango
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it will take, strategic vision, money, proper planning and the right incentives to get the best outcome.

And better quality builders. (i.e. ones who manage to build to the standards). 

Delbert isn't a member any more, sadly, but he had countless tales of the dreadful installation of the products he sold. Every possible corner was cut, whether for reasons of cost or time. 

P.S. Full disclosure:- my house has a DPC installed too close to ground level. It's only 40 years old. Just cr@ppy builders.

Stephen

Democratic dissent is not disloyalty, it is a positive civic duty

aerobod
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Hi Stephen, what we have here in Canada is the R-2000 standard for energy efficient home construction that builders have to be trained, certified and licenced to. They can then charge a premium for building houses that meet the standard, but they can lose their licence, too, if they don't adhere to it. Each house that is built is evaluated by an independent 3rd party, with the certification results given to the home buyer: https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy-efficiency/homes/professional-opportunities/become-energy-efficient-builder/details-the-r-2000-standard/20588 Appendix B gives basic equations for target energy consumption.

Applying the Canadian R-2000 standard to a UK average detached house at 150m^2 floor space (400m^3 heated living space volume) with a family of 4 using 225 litres of hot water a day, assuming 1900 heating degree days per year in the south of England, the target energy consumption for space and hot water heating using natural gas would be around 6,000kWh per year, or £620 annual gas bill (for energy used) with the impending 10.33p per kWh price.

James

Golf Juliet Tango
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That's a lot of detail James. I hope the supervision regime is effective.

There is a failure of oversight over here too.

I'm sure details of the lies, ommisions, evasions and examples of turning a blind eye over Grenfell Tower are known to you.  These failures apply to dozens of tall buildings in the UK 

Stephen

Democratic dissent is not disloyalty, it is a positive civic duty

TomB
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it will take, strategic vision, money, proper planning and the right incentives to get the best outcome.

We're stuffed then, it'll never happen.