Coming to roads near all of us, so keep your eyes peeled!

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Golf Juliet Tango
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Coming to roads near all of us, so keep your eyes peeled!

Thank you @TurnersLtd for this article celebrating our new partnership. 99% of UK truck drivers are men, so being able to use one of Turners' new trailers to raise awareness of our research is an amazing opportunity. Coming to roads near you in 2022.

Read all about this partnership here: https://www.turners-distribution.com/home/about-us/latest-news/121-turners-team-up-with-prostate-cancer-research-for-uk-wide-advertising-on-new-trailers

Steve Wright
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Our neck of the woods, we often see Turner's Trucks on the road.

 

Norfolk AR - Member since 1996

Toughie
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Good for them.  And for us blokes. 

We ought to take a leaf out of the women's book, and agitate for more testing.

Alan

Jonathan Kay
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The decision of the National Screening Committee was very difficult but correct... no screening programme, consultation with GP must be available, PSA testing must be available after that. 
https://view-health-screening-recommendations.service.gov.uk/prostate-ca...

There's now a fair bit of pressure to review that, but I can't find a convenient summary of what has changed.

Jonathan

Geoff Brown
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JK -  'PSA testing must be available after that'. From the experiences of a male family member the accolade of Chocolate Tea Pot must be awarded to the PSA test.

If it were not for his persistence in knowing his own body (the symptoms he had were not that well defined) the PSA test would have given him the all clear. Thankfully he persuaded his rather stubborn GP to refer him which caught the C very, very early. All is OK now.

Is there a minority of men in the same position & end up with incurable problems ?

 

Jonathan Kay
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Prostate cancer without an elevated PSA is seen but it's rare. We'll probably work out why it happens as it becomes more common to characterise the cell line in individual patients. 

...

On the wider issue of early diagnosis of cancer in general it does look as if the UK has poor performance compared to similar countries. There are several different reasons, and it's a very difficult problem to address. At the moment there's a lot of concern that the outbreak might have made it worse. 

Jonathan

 

Golf Juliet Tango
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I thought the absence of a screening programme comparable to breast cancer was due to lack of accuracy.

If the falae negatives can be reduced to a minimal level then a programme is worth the effort and cost.

Stephen

Democratic dissent is not disloyalty, it is a positive civic duty

Jonathan Kay
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The major failing against the criteria for population screening is knowing what to do with a positive result. There just wasn't enough evidence for any intervention or combination of interventions.

That can be worded as either too many false positives (men detected with cancer but for whom treatment isn't needed or is harmful), or as a lack of specificity of the initial test (serum PSA) for the subgroup of men with cancer where intervention would be worthwhile.

From that starting point improvements can come in several ways, including: a different initial test, better identification of subgroups after an initial positive test, better treatments. At the moment better treatments look most likely to tip the balance in favour of a population screening programme in the future.

Jonathan

Toughie
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I seem to remember reading somewhere that for every £1 the NHS spends specifically on men's health, it spends £8 on women's health.  I'm sure someone better informed will be able to correct the figure I have quoted.

I also accept that, with maternity and the menopause (why isn't it the 'womenopause'?), the figure is bound to be greater for women, but I believe there is still a disproportionate difference.  Perhaps because we blokes simply don't agitate or push for it enough.

Alan

Jonathan Kay
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When the NSC was *reviewing whether England should have a population screening programme for prostate cancer it often came up that it wasn't "fair" that women had two programmes and men didn't have any. Sometimes explicitly and sometimes unspoken in what were often heated discussions. Reference to the criteria was used to point out that this concept wasn't included...

And then screening for aneurysms of the abdominal aorta was introduced... but only for men.

Jonathan

* That wasn't the latest review, by which time I had moved to pastures new.

Jonathan Kay
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"I seem to remember reading somewhere that for every £1 the NHS spends specifically on men's health, it spends £8 on women's health.  I'm sure someone better informed will be able to correct the figure I have quoted.

"I also accept that, with maternity and the menopause (why isn't it the 'womenopause'?), the figure is bound to be greater for women, but I believe there is still a disproportionate difference.  Perhaps because we blokes simply don't agitate or push for it enough."

 

I don't know the figures but you haven't included gynaecology and premenopausal reproductive medicine in there. There's a lot more need in women.

 

What would you push for, please?

 

Jonathan

 

PS: The etymology of menopause is from the Classical Greek for month.