2022 F1 SEASON INCL SPOILERS

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Tom_Arundel
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The `new` front wing reminds me of Boudicca`s chariot! How can you do close racing and `Max style` overtakes with that and its nice slicey bits sticking out. Seems to have been designed on a computer with no thought for racing realities. It will be interesting to see how many `saftey car` incidents and silly outcomes are caused by it.Silly (not that I will be watching F1 anymore!) 

Steve Wilkins
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I'm wondering what steps Haas might make in 2022 given Dallara's experience with underbody downforce in Indycar and choosing to largely ignore 2021.

Wrightpayne
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I'm really intrigued to see how everyone adapts to the tyre, a topic debated / discussed / cogitated numerous times on blatchat.

Discussions suggest 13" wheels with 60 profile tyres are near optimum for the seven. A nice amount of sidewall to give some flex and aid the suspension. The least desireable, from a handling perspective are the 16" five spokes albeit they look fantastic IMHO.

F1 are making this move and up to this point all chassis and suspension development has been based on the constant of 13" wheels and tyres with a high profile. Big wheels and lower profile tyres change everything.

I wonder if they'll be hitting the curbs as much?

Tony Whitley
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Just think of the poor TV directors who won't be able to fill their programmes with ultra slow-mos of wobbly tyres anymore Weeping

I assume the chassis designers are pleased as they'll have a lot more control without loads of undamped soggy rubber in the equation?

Harry Flatters
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Presumably with the degree of flex provided by the 13" tyre walls now substantially reduced, we will see a shift to more movement in the actual suspension components and as Tony says, more control of sprung weight.

Can't help it though, the aesthetics of the 18" wheel (covers 'n' all) are ugly. Still, I expect we will get over it, much like the halo.

At least the halo now looks a far more refined solution compared to the Indy car aeroscreens. 

Wrightpayne
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The camera operatives will just have to film something else that wobbles and show us in slo-mo! 

BBL
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#17. They got rid of the grid girls years ago. 

Smile Sean

Harry Flatters
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Anyone who thinks that being an F1 mechanic/engineer is a cushy number should have a read of this article.

Your average mechanic seems to earn around £30k-£40k pa. Obviously some senior positions do better, but that seems to be about the norm. 

Equally, I'm certain that some teams treat their staff better than others, but if this article is a fair reflection of life on the F1 road, then as the writer says, there could well be a critical tipping point rapidly approaching.

These people do the job because they love F1 and being told to 'do one' if they find it too tough, is not helpful.

Anyway, read the article yourself and make up your own mind.

rgrigsby
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#19 doesn't sound good, there was an interesting diary-type article written by someone in F1 a while back. I think they were in McLaren, It painted a picture of extreme pressure, long days, and a relentless pace of work that generally seemed to burn most people out in 3-4 years.

That was some time ago, I can't imagine what it's like now with the increased number of races. Sounds like they may have a real problem on their hands if it's not addressed.

TomB
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This is worth a read, but it’s getting a bit old now but illustrates  what the life an mechanic was like in the eighties and nineties.